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Coronavirus and the Bond Market

What’s in Today’s Report:

  • Bond Market Update: Bull Steepening and New Record Lows in the 10-Year Yield
  • Coronavirus Facts and Fears

U.S. stock futures were volatile overnight, reversing from tentative gains to losses as global shares continued to decline amid the evolving coronavirus outbreak situation.

News regarding COVID-19 remained largely the same overnight; the outbreak in China continues to be contained but is spreading more rapidly in other regions including the EU.

The 10-Yr yield is encouragingly stabilizing this morning while the 2-Yr continues to decline as traders are now pricing in 65% odds of a Fed rate cut by April due to the coronavirus outbreak’s negative effects on the economy.

Today, coronavirus headlines will continue to dominate the news and markets however, there is one economic report to watch: New Home Sales (E: 708K) and two Fed officials are scheduled to speak: Kaplan (9:35 a.m. ET) and Kashkari (1:00 p.m. ET).

Is The Bond Market Finally Turning Positive on Global Growth?

What’s in Today’s Report:

  • Is The Bond Market Finally Turning More Positive On Growth?
  • Another Brexit Worry?
  • EIA and Oil Market Update – No Breakout Yet

Futures are flat following a very quiet night of news.

Economic data was mixed as Australian jobs adds beat expectations (39k vs. (E) 18k) while British retail sales badly missed estimates in November (-0.6% vs. (E) 0.5%. But, neither number is moving markets.

On the earnings front, Micron (MU) had positive commentary and the stock rallied 5% after hours, and that’s helping broader market sentiment this morning (it’s the single biggest reason stocks are flat).

Today’s focus will remain on economic data, and there are three notable reports including (in order of importance):  Jobless Claims (E: 221K), Philly Fed (E: 8.5) and Existing Home Sales (E: 5.450M).

As has been the case, the stronger the data, the better, and if we get decent prints from these reports, we’ll be looking at 3200 in the S&P 500 shortly after the open.

Tom Essaye Quoted in CNBC on August 14, 2019

“Historically speaking the inversion of that benchmark yield curve measure means that we now must expect a recession anywhere from six-to-18 months from today which will…” said Tom Essaye in a note on Wednesday. Click here to read the full article.

Yield Curve Graph

Tom Essaye Quoted in ETF Daily News on June 27, 2019

“For now what the bond market is doing is signaling the chances of a recession are more likely than the chances of a renewal of the expansion,” said Tom Essaye, founder of Sevens Report Research. Click here to read the full article.

Graph

Tom Essaye Quoted in CNBC on June 27, 2019

“For now what the bond market is doing is signaling the chances of a recession are more likely than the chances of a renewal of the expansion,” said Tom Essaye, founder of Sevens Report Research. Click here to read the full article.

Traders on stock exchange floor

Tom Essaye Quoted in ETF Trends on Jun 3, 2019

Tom Essaye quoted in ETF Trends. “There can be no clearer message than that to the Fed: Rates are too high. This is the bond market’s equivalent of a bullhorn screaming it in Powell’s face.” Click here to read the full article.

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Tom Essaye Quoted in Fox2Now on May 29, 2019

The bond market is once again sending a big fat warning sign about the US economy. “For stocks to continue to rally we need to see higher Treasury yields driven by hopes for better growth…” said Tom Essaye, editor of the Sevens Report.

 

Tom Essaye Quoted in ETF Trends on May 28, 2019

The Federal Reserve has been on cruise control thus far in 2019 with respect to interest rate policy, opting to keep the federal funds rate untouched. However, the bond markets are screaming for a rate cut, according to Sevens Report Research. Click here to read the full article.

Lady with a Loud Speaker

The Bond Market Is Screaming For a Rate Cut

What’s in Today’s Report:

  • Why The Bond Market Is Screaming For a Rate Cut

Futures are bouncing modestly following some hopeful comments by President Trump on U.S.-China trade.

Late yesterday President Trump made comments expressing optimism about an eventual U.S.-China trade deal that includes a solution for Huawei.  No specifics or new details were provided, however.

Brexit entered a new phase as PM May announced she will resign on June 7th.  But, until a “No Deal” becomes more likely, the global markets will continue ignore Brexit.

Today focus will be on Durable Goods Orders (E: -2.0%) and support at 2800 in the S&P 500.  Yesterday that support level held and that’s a key number to watch going forward, as a violation of 2800 could open up an “air pocket” in stocks.

Regarding Durable Goods, it’d be nice if the data was solid, but it’s an April number so it won’t reflect activity following the flare up of U.S.-China trade tensions, and the headline is likely to be negatively skewed by cancellations for the 737, which started last month.

Another Bad Signal From the Bond Market

What’s in Today’s Report:

  • Why Another Bond Auction Caused Yesterday’s Decline
  • The Next Catalyst for Markets (Coming This Sunday)

Futures are slightly higher following a positive U.S/China trade article and better than expected EU economic data.

EU Money Supply (M3) rose 4.1% vs. (E) 3.9%, delivering the first upside economic surprise in Europe in some time.  And, while M3 isn’t exactly a widely followed report, at this point we’ll take what good data we can get from Europe.

On trade, a Reuters article stated Chinese officials have made new concessions on IP rights and tech transfers which represents an incrementally positive step, although other issues still need to be resolved before there is a an official deal.

Today there are some notable economic reports including Final Q4 ‘18 GDP (E: 2.2%), Jobless Claims (E: 225K), and Pending Home Sales (E: -1.0%) but none of them should move markets unless there are major surprises.  Similarly, there are numerous Fed speakers, Quarles (7:15 a.m. ET), Clarida (9:30 a.m. ET), Bowman (10:00 a.m. ET), Bostic (11:30 a.m. ET) and Bullard (6:20 p.m. ET), but again they shouldn’t move markets, either.

So, we’ll be watching bond yields as the key to whether stocks can resume the rally.  If bond yields (Treasury yields and Bund yields) can move higher today, then likely so can stocks